Gay Pride

Two kinds of LGBT Pride

The dictionary defines pride in this way:
1. The state or feeling of being proud. A becoming or dignified sense of what is due to oneself or one’s position or character; self-respect; self-esteem.
2. A high or inordinate opinion of one’s own dignity, importance, merit, or superiority, whether as cherished in the mind or as displayed in bearing, conduct, etc.

Gay pride or LGBT pride is the positive stance against discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people to promote their self-affirmation, dignity, equality rights, increase their visibility as a social group, build community, and celebrate sexual diversity and gender variance. Pride, as opposed to shame and social stigma, is the predominant outlook that bolsters most LGBT rights movements throughout the world. (From Wikipedia)

Gay pride has been used to indicate the state or feeling of being proud in a becoming sense of what is due to oneself as a member of the LGBT community. It indicates confidence in the rightness of one’s position or character, of having self-respect and self-esteem.

After many years of prejudice and even violence in Australia LGBT forms of sexual orientation and practice are accepted, are not to be discriminated against, they are an obvious part of life in the community and are protected by law.

Businesses have found a new and profitable customer base that is also a valuable asset for advertising purposes.

This has led to significant changes in the community.

Unchanged, however, is the fact that the scriptures of at least the major religions, Christianity, Islam and Judaism all teach that the adherents of these religions should not participate in nor approve of a range of things including homosexual practices. On the other hand they have come to accept that in our society LGBT people have the right to live according to their declared lifestyle. One indication of this acceptance was shown by voting to allow for same-sex-marriage to be legalised under Australian law.

They have come to accept others with behaviours for which they cannot give approval. Acceptance is one thing but approval causes them serious conflicts as they are asked to ignore straightforward teaching in their scriptures or presumptuously edit them to the opinions of others.

When people state or hold to these beliefs the LGBT community tends to take offence, to demand that such views not be expressed and to rouse others in the community to also express anger and offence.

A “becoming or dignified sense of what is due to oneself or one’s position or character; self-respect; self-esteem” expressed as gay pride should mean LGBT people would be confident of their views, confident enough not to take offence at the beliefs of others who cannot live the same lifestyle. An inability to cope with a differing opinion indicates an uncertainty of the rightness of their own opinion. Differing opinions should not damage the rightness of their beliefs nor their pride.

The religious believers are usually quite confident of their beliefs and do not expect, need nor receive approval of their beliefs.

It is unbecoming of LGBT people and their supporters to require not simply acceptance of their lifestyle but also that it be given approval by those who cannot give it. It is inconsistent that they should need approval.

This kind of pride shows a high or inordinate opinion of one’s own dignity, importance, merit, or superiority, whether as cherished in the mind or as displayed in bearing, conduct, etc.
At this point LGBT pride becomes unbecoming, unattractive, uncivil and even offensive.

When this form of pride becomes the norm people who portray it risks losing sympathy or support as the community begins to question the legitimacy of the pride and their cause is damaged. Do they now have anything to be proud of?

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